Monday, January 26, 2015

Intel Curie module



http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/wearables/wearable-soc.html

Key Features

•       A low-power, 32-bit Intel® Quark™ SE SoC
•       384kB Flash memory, 80kB SRAM
•       A low-power integrated DSP sensor hub with a proprietary pattern matching accelerator
•       Bluetooth* Low Energy
•       6-axis combo sensor with accelerometer and gyroscope
•       Battery charging circuitry (PMIC)


Tuesday, December 30, 2014

Parkinson's law of triviality, also known as bikeshedding, bike-shed effect

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parkinson's_law_of_triviality

Parkinson's law of triviality, also known as bikesheddingbike-shed effect, or the bicycle-shed example, is C. Northcote Parkinson's 1957 argument that organizations give disproportionate weight to trivial issues.[1] Parkinson observed and illustrated that a committee whose job is to approve plans for a nuclear power plant spent the majority of its time with pointless discussions on relatively trivial and unimportant but easy-to-grasp issues, such as what materials to use for the staff bike-shed, while neglecting the less-trivial proposed design of the nuclear power plant itself, which is far more important but also a far more difficult and complex task to criticize constructively.

The law has been applied to software development[2] and other activities, and the term "bikeshedding" was coined as a metaphor to illuminate Parkinson's Law of Triviality and was popularized in the Berkeley Software Distribution community by Poul-Henning Kamp[3] and has spread from there to the software industry at large.

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Sony Leaks Reveal Hollywood Is Trying To Break DNS


Sony Leaks Reveal Hollywood Is Trying To Break DNS

from the scorched-net-policy dept.
schwit1 sends this report from The Verge:Most anti-piracy tools take one of two paths: they either target the server that's sharing the files (pulling videos off YouTube or taking down sites like The Pirate Bay) or they make it harder to find (delisting offshore sites that share infringing content). But leaked documents reveal a frightening line of attack that's currently being considered by the MPAA: What if you simply erased any record that the site was there in the first place? To do that, the MPAA's lawyers would target the Domain Name System that directs traffic across the internet

The tactic was first proposed as part of the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) in 2011, but three years after the law failed in Congress, the MPAA has been looking for legal justification for the practice in existing law and working with ISPs like Comcast to examine how a system might work technically. If a takedown notice could blacklist a site from every available DNS provider, the URL would be effectively erased from the internet. No one's ever tried to issue a takedown notice like that, but this latest memo suggests the MPAA is looking into it as a potentially powerful new tool in the fight against piracy.